My Creative Workbook

Christine de Beer - effortless floral craftsman

Controlled breaking a thin reed to create a grass spiral armature

Cut a reed at an extremely sharp angle

Cut a reed at an extremely sharp angle to make it easier to pierce and thread the grass.

Cut a bundle of grass

Cut a bundle of grass.

Economy design tip: This is an ideal way to use the ends of your grass that you cut away when weaving.

Thread the grass into the reed

Thread the grass into the reed.

Simply move the grass to the reed end as you add new blades

Simply move the grass to the reed end as you add new blades.

Build up the grass so that it will fan out

Build up the grass so that it will fan out.

I wanted to explain a bit more about choosing/ manipulating this reed so I moved the conversation to this weeks notification email so that I can explain... and you can comment or ask questions. Make sure you are subscribed to our once-a-week email for the exclusive weekly tip and to join the conversation. The subscribers button is below.

Creating a stacked grass armature to fan out

Creating a stacked grass armature to fan out

Hmmm... This has creative potential just as it is... don't you think?

Slowly start to break the reed in tiny sections

Slowly start to break the reed in tiny sections. Control the break so that it does not simply snap away.

I have included a bit more information on how to do this in our subscriber's email. Book readers I also have a lot more information about this in my book. Turn to page 284 where I explain how to manipulate stems... and larger branches in this way.

To read more about my book The Effortless Floral Craftsman

When you have a full circle curve you are ready to design with your armature

When you have a full circle curve you are ready to design with your armature.

Cut away the reed ends and slip the grass into a glass

Cut away the reed ends and slip the grass into a glass container. Twist the grass to fan it out.

Add a few jasmine vines into the armature

Add a few jasmine vines into the armature.

Fill the container with water

Fill the container with water so that all the grass ends are under water.

Glue a blade of grass to over the last grass to conceal the reed end

Glue a blade of grass to over the last grass to conceal the reed end.

Add in the orchids to cascade out of the armature

Add in the orchids to cascade out of the armature.

Place a few dew drop crystals into the design

Place a few dew drop crystals into the design. See the Tutorial below for more detailed instructions on how I do this without damaging the plant material.

Every week I add a new design with related tutorials. Be sure to subscribe to receive an email notification with design inspiration.

Tutorials

8 July 2015 Using a pin to place tiny dew drop crystals

It's sometimes difficult to place a tiny crystal or bead exactly where you want it.

15 January 2020 Over and under weave floral panel armature for inside a vase

Weave a small panel that fits snugly in a container for a minimal, foam free design that is quick to make but looks spectacular.

2 July 2019 Grass Spiral Wind Spinner

Thread grass into flexi grass to create a spinner that gently turns in the wind.

31 July 2019 Adding folded grass "jitters" to a Sunflower

Adding tension to a design with a grass frame and collar.

4 July 2018 Bundle Support

Tie a bundle of lily grass in a bundle to offer support for your flowers.

7 May 2014 Rethinking the traditional Komiwara technique

Komiwara is a classic and traditional Ikebana technique used in a Rikka design. Designers would usually bundle straw to keep the flowers in place.

22 June 2016 Lily grass spiral in a vase

Twist lily grass slightly to create a spiral for the orchids to nestle in

17 July 2012 Prevent scratches, rust and water stains on display surfaces

This is a great, non permanent way to protect surfaces from damage

13 January 2016 Stacked Grass Pyramid Armature

Stack snippets of grass on a wire frame to make a floating pyramid armature

25 June 2014 Musical staff line armature

Drill holes into sticks to create a suspended armature

23 April 2014 Flower catcher

Keep a flower suspended just above water with palm leaves

25 August 2011 Placing orchids in test tubes

Cut the Phalaenopsis orchid with a bit of green stem attached. This will make them last longer.

10 August 2011 Free standing basket

I tied the strong inside veins of the 5 Aspidistra leaves (that I used to make the garland with) to make my basket armature.

Favourite Flowers

Phalaenopsis

Phalaenopsis, Moth orchid

Related Designs

17 February 2021 From here in out

An all natural, zero waste design using only plant material.

15 January 2020 This way we connect

Weave a connected panel to frame a single orchid.

3 July 2019 Taking a Breather

A relaxing summer design that spins gently in the wind

31 July 2019 Jitters!

Zig-zag grass details add a bit of tension to the design

29 May 2019 Creative Competition

This week I am so excited to share my article and design that was published in the recent issue of the Floral Art Society of New Zealand's Academy Magazine for NZ qualified...

4 July 2018 Wonder

Tie a bundle of grass to support your floral details

7 May 2014 Serendipity

Be inspired by traditional Ikebana techniques

22 June 2016 Perfection

Spiral grass to create a nest for the lady slipper orchids

13 January 2016 Once Upon A Time

Stack and glue a Grass Pyramid Armature

25 June 2014 Fine Tune

Thread cane through sticks to make a music inspired armature

23 April 2014 Bound to Keep

Weave and tie a decorative catcher to suspend flowers

10 August 2011 Pleated Pleasure

Pleats are accordion like folds of equal width in alternating opposite directions in any kind of fabric. I absolutely love the tight buds of Allium and they represent the...